All posts by Sam P

Contra Industries – Custom Decals

 

Have you seen those cool sticker wraps on chargers and radio’s, or ever wondered where to get your own custom decals and graphics? Well we spoke to Adelaide based, Contra Industries to see how they make it happen.

It all starts with you finding a design or logo which can be sent electronically, the higher the resolution the better the results will be. If you don’t have something in mind then Reece from Contra Industries can steer you in the right direction.

Once a design has been chosen it will be scaled and an electronic draft will be created. Cut lines will be added to the image for easy peeling from the backing sheet. The image is printed by a commercial vinyl printer onto a quality piece of adhesive sticker vinyl. If required a varnish can also be added to preserve the decal from containments like nitro fuel.

The decal is then complete and ready for application, Contra Industries can post your new decals to you around Australia.

If your looking for some quality custom decals to add the finishing touches to your model, rc race car or other rc related equipment then Contra Industries is contactable via Facebook. They also have a lot of their past work on display for inspiration.

 

Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 Lite build review

Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 Lite build review

There is no doubt that the ER-12M 2.0 lightweight is a good looking 2wd buggy with its milled alloy chassis, carbon towers and beautifully presented shocks. I have also found that it is very similar to the Team Durango DEX210, which is probably a good thing considering these are a popular and well regarded buggy. Over a week I set out to build the ER-12 and review it as I went about building it.

Chassis and Towers

The chassis of this car is possibly the most striking I have ever seen and it went together very well, there were no issues at all and the car feels rock solid. The chassis has braces running the full length to add strength and the shock towers are made of 5mm thick carbon fibre. The chassis and towers are for me the most impressive part of the car and if you’re seeking a solid and tough platform that can handle the big impacts then this car is most definitely for you.

The arms on this car are made of a nice strong plastic and they have very little free play. Arms feature a grub screw so that you can adjust suspension droop in the same manner you would on an on-road car. Both front and rear arms are gullwing style, however there is currently no straight arm option available for the front of these cars, which would be more suited to Australian track conditions.

The space for the electronics can be tight, depending on what electronics you are fitting into your vehicle. I found that you must use a low profile servo with this vehicle or you will really struggle to fit anything in the front other than the smallest of electronics. I have used the electronics from my stadium truck in the test vehicle and I had to lightly grind a small section of the chassis brace in order to neatly fit it all in.

Another great feature of the chassis are the Intech monogrammed brass weights which can be placed in the front to improve weight distribution. I also liked the swing away carbon fibre battery straps and alloy thumb screws which not only look great but will make battery changes quick and easy.

Steering and Suspension

Steering on the ER-12 is an all alloy and carbon fibre affair with the drag link being carbon fibre and all other components being alloy. The steering is super smooth with the servo sitting inside a frame rather than on individual mounts.

Suspension is also impressive with an all alloy body, alloy cap and red anodised collar. Shocks went together pretty much the same as any other shocker I’ve built, are smooth and do not leak a drop. The pistons are slightly oversize at 12.4mm which means that you won’t be using your big bore TLR or AE pistons in this car. I found this a little frustrating as I have a plethora of 12mm pistons which would not fit the ER-12. The stock pistons are all 6 hole of varying sizes, I have chosen to use the 1.2mm up front with 30wt oil and the 1.3mm in the back with 25wt oil.

Driveline

The ER-12 comes standard with a traditional style 4 gear transmission, however a 3 gear is also available. You also have a choice of ball or gear differential and I have chosen to build our ER-12 with the 4 gear transmission and with the ball differential. The ball differential went together easily and is very smooth, but make sure you fully compress the spring before assembly. I especially liked the caged thrust bearing which is carried on the inside of the outdrives, rather than outside, where they would be more susceptible to dirt ingression. The differential rings are also keyed and sit securely on the inside of the outdrives. The differential also has an all alloy T-nut which retains the main spring on the differential, rather than a plastic one. The top shaft of the transmission on the ER-12 is an interesting setup, as it is reversed with the slipper being adjusted from the rear. Overall the driveline has no slop, moves freely and is precise.

Body and wing

The body and wing is made of a quite thick and strong polycarbonate plastic, however the cut lines were not clear around the transmission and you will need to mark your own lines. This is necessary to get the body to fit around the transmission. Once you have cut a hole for the transmission the body fits well and comes with Velcro to secure it as well as a pin arrangement. I removed the pin arrangement and will just use the Velcro around the edges of the chassis to secure it.

Improvements

The kit as a whole is very good but if I was to make any changes I would like to see the instructions printed a little bigger to make them clearer and also the screws placed in bags with labels telling you their size. This would speed up the build particularly if it was your first time building an Intech vehicle. I would also like Intech to provide in their instructions the spring rate of the kit springs, the number of teeth on the kit spur and the final drive ratio to make setting the car up easier.

Conclusion

The whole kit went together very well and has taken about 10 hours to build. Tolerances throughout the car are precise and overall the car has little to no slop in key areas such as the arms, steering and shock mounts. Components on this car are all top notch and you certainly get a lot of standard parts that others would call hop-ups and charge you extra for.

I originally intended to build and race this car in the stock buggy class but as I built it I have come to the conclusion that it would be better suited to the modified class. The solid build and lack of smaller spur options has meant that getting the ER-12 setup for modified will be far easier than stock.

In the new year I’ll be bringing you a full race and track review of the ER-12, so bring on the 2018 season!

Rcstore.com.au are currently offering 15% off the entire Intech Racing range and throwing in free Australian postage!

If you’d like check out the full range of Intech Racing cars and products check out www.intechracing.com or to get your hands on any of the cars in the Intech Racing range, contact the Australian distributor, Duncan at duncan@rcstore.com.au or (TEL) 0408 906 326. We also need to give a huge Thankyou to the team at Intech Racing and Rcstore.com.au

Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 buggy Lite- Unboxing Review

Intech Racing, I had never heard of them either until recently, but they are a Taiwanese manufacturer making a fresh push into the Australian market with some unique and innovative ideas. Intech Racing is a relative newcomer to Australia but they have been building cars for over ten years with a focus on continuous improvement. Intech Racing manufactures a range of off-road buggies and trucks in both 10th and 8th scale, with either electric or nitro power trains.

Intech Racing has kindly provided Aussie RC News with an ER-12M 2.0 Lite 2wd buggy to build and review. Prior to sending a test vehicle, Intech Racing contacted me to discuss which vehicle we would like to test first. After looking at their range of smart looking vehicles the ER-12M 2.0 Lite 2wd buggy stood out to me as a vehicle which would be well suited to racing and being 2wd we could put it to the test in the 2wd stock class, racing against the established brands.

The ER-12 2.0M is a rear wheel drive buggy, with a mid-mounted motor design and a narrow aluminium chassis. This type of design is now the most common in Australia, with rear mounted motor platforms now a rarity. Continue reading Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 buggy Lite- Unboxing Review

Team C EP 1/10 long term review

Over the past three seasons I have been running a fleet of Team C cars in both on and off road. The only reason these vehicles were chosen was due to their cheap price and at the time, local track side support.

These vehicles are priced at the lower end of the market and do not have the pedigree of the established brands, but that does not mean that they are not durable or capable vehicles.

My experiences have been with the TS2TE 2wd short course truck, the TC02 2wd buggy in both rear and mid mount and the TR10 all-wheel drive touring car. All of these vehicles have been around for some time now and are generally similar to vehicles once produced by the established brands. I won’t go into the specifics of each car as an online search will get you any specifications you may need, but I will elaborate on the shortcomings and issues that I have overcome.

I’ll start with the on road car first, the TR10. This car was a ready built and only needed electrics, it was cheap and I mean real cheap. I only purchased it to race indoors during the winter when we couldn’t race off road due to the weather. The car is very basic and comes with absolutely useless pre mounted tyres, that offer no grip and are not suitable for racing at all. It has plastic hexes which always fall off the hub or get jammed in the wheel hex when changing tyres. The plastics are of a low quality and strip easily so care is needed. I found the servo mount to be particularly annoying as the plastic is so poor is flexes easily and the servo twists in the mount. The only real positive I found is that despite its short comings it can handle a beating, I regularly hit the boards around the local track and never broke anything except for popping a rear axle pin out once. Overall I wouldn’t recommend this car to anyone interested in racing, but it may make a good drift car by locking the rear diff and fitting some drift tyres. In hindsight I would have been better off finding a used X-ray or Yokomo as a cheap platform to get into on road.

Now onto the off road cars and the TS2TE has been a solid performer and I have enjoyed owning it but if you want to make it a reliable truck then the first thing you will need to upgrade is the rear chassis brace. The kit comes with a plastic brace which is just not up to the task and it is common for the ball studs to tear out of the plastic brace. Replacing it with an alloy brace will solve this issue completely and give you a little more weight in front of the rear axle which can only help with some rear traction.

The other areas which need beefing up are the ball cups and hubs. If you have the alloy hubs which is part of the TS2TE kit you will be fine, but you will want to get these if you have the plastic hubs as they tend to fail at the ball stud. The ball cups are fine initially but they seem to lose their strength pretty quickly, I have found replacing them with the cup used on the TLR22 has worked well.

The only other area that requires some attention is getting out some of the slop in the arms, this is common with all Team C cars as they do not have the tolerances of the established brands. A little time spent shimming out the slop is all that is required.

The TC02 buggy is a similar story to the TS2TE and a lot of the parts have commonality which is pretty handy if you’re running multiple cars. The TC02C mid mount buggy is actually a pretty good car, it doesn’t have all the adjustability of a TLR or AE car, but you can achieve a reliable and predictable setup.

There are no real weak points with this buggy and the only modifications are performance orientated. The kit springs are of average quality and there are not a lot of factory tunning options available, but fortunately they use the now industry standard 12mm big bore shocks. This allows you to use a variety of other manufacturer’s springs, such as the TLR low frequency springs on the rear and standard TLR springs on the front. With the springs and shocks sorted the car is well balanced and provides predictable handling.

Overall Team C cars are a cheap and reliable platform however their biggest downside can be parts availability, local suppliers seem to have little stock and are regularly sold out for long periods. Unlike the big brands you do not have much choice when it comes to hop ups and option parts and the prices of some of the hop ups are way more expensive than an equivalent hop up for a TLR or AE car.

The TC02 and TC02C represent exceptional value on the second hand market and well sorted mid mount buggies regularly change hands at my local club for around $100 or less. This makes them a very cheap entry level car for someone just getting into racing and a great car to learn on.

Purchasing these Team C cars new is a different proposition and the value equation is not as compelling. At a local Adelaide hobby shop the TC02 is being sold for $399 which is only just cheaper than a Team Associated B6 or $100 more than the TLR 22 3.0 which is currently in run out. At this price you would expect the TC02 to be comparable to the other vehicles in this price bracket, but in reality it is not even in the same league. Add to this the lack of local support, lower quality componentry and lack of parts availability and you should be looking elsewhere for your first or next 1/10 car.

thPKB0FFMI

AussieRC gets new SA contributor

Hi Everyone, yesterday we saw Chris from WA join the Aussie RC news team, today SA gets a representative.

So now it’s my turn to introduce myself, I’m Sam from Adelaide and I primarily race 1/10 EP OFR at Mitchell Park. I have also been known to dabble in some 1/10 ONR on Friday nights.

I am currently involved with the Adelaide Radio Controlled Raceway, which is Adelaide’s only 1/10 EP OFR club and have been on the committee for the past season.

I will admit that I am probably going to be more than a little biased towards 1/10 OFR but I am more than happy to promote or report on any RC events in South Australia.

So if you have an event, news or product to review in South Australia then I am contactable via the AussieRC page or via email at RoadWarriorRC@outlook.com

me

Thanks

Sam

Bad news for Adelaide on-roaders!

Bad news coming out of Adelaide with the closure of the last indoor on-road racing facility. Hobby Habit located in Melrose Park, which has been hosting Friday night on-road meetings since the Parks track closed is shutting the track come the 30th of June 2017.  This comes on the back of the indoor off-road track at Hobby Habit closing last year and leaves the only on-road track in Adelaide situated at Littlehampton in the Adelaide Hills.

AussieRC understands that the areas once used as on and off road tracks at Hobby Habit will be converted into storage for caravans and alike.

Fortunately for Adelaide drivers, 1/10 on-road racing will continue on alternate  Saturdays at Littlehampton and off-road drivers are catered for at the awesome ARCR track at Mitchell Park.