Category Archives: Accessories

PROTOform Corvette Pro-Mod Body

Got a Traxxas Slash, but you really want a dragster, then this new body from PROTOform is for you!!!

Transform your Slash® 2wd truck into a scale 1/4-mile beast with the new PROTOform Chevrolet Corvette C7 Pro-Mod! Our first body dedicated to the growing SC Drag Racing class features a ton of realistic details to give your car a super unique, race-inspired look.

The C7 Pro-Mod is a convenient 1-piece body design with no assembly necessary: just paint it up in your favorite colors and start burning rubber! We recommend using Pro-Line Racing #Hoosier 2.2″ Drag Racing Front Tires on the front and Hoosier Drag Slick SC 2.2″/3.0″ Drag Racing Tires in the rear combined with a set of #Pomona Drag Spec Wheels for the ultimate scale hot-rod stance.

To create a more scale look, this officially-licensed body is designed with a narrower track width than a traditional SC body and will require some modifications to your 2wd Slash® in order to fit correctly. Check out the product page link below for more details!

RC4WD 4Runner Review

I was ecstatic when RC4WD contacted me to review their new hard body for the Trail Finder 2 chassis late last year. However try as I may I couldn’t wheedle out of them what it was until it arrived at my door. As we know now, it was a Toyota 4Runner from 1985 that came out of that box, and today we can now reveal the finished product in all it’s 80’s glory!

First Impressions

My first impressions of the kit when I opened the box was of amazement at the level of detail that it included from big details like opening doors, tailgate and bonnet, down to stickers for the dashboard, instruction placard for 4wd and even the tiny indicator stalks on the steering column. At this time my excitement moved a little into the arena of panic. Whilst I have built an worked on a lot of RC cars from Kits to RTR’s, this was my first detailed hard body from any firm, let alone one with a reputation for amazing detail like Rc4wd, and I really didn’t want to make a mess of it. But then how different could it be to the model plane and tank kits I used to make not so many years ago…. right?

The Build

So working with a combination of tools for my radio control racing pit bag, and my modelling toolbox I set off on the build. Naturally the first step was reading the instructions and then I put it all away for the next most important step, research. Below are the images that I used for inspiration.

No, i’m not mad (ok, maybe a little) but a key part of any project like this is knowing what the vehicles looked like in real life, and knowing what colours you want to paint it, what markings (in this case stickers) you need to use, and details like bumper colours etc etc. With that done and deciding to go with a bright red colour scheme I purchased a can or red paint, some black and browns for the interior, and the build could begin in earnest.

Tip 1: know your size, 1 pressure pack of tamiya paint may be fine for a small tank in 1:72 or 1:48, but not a big 1:10 4wd! In the end I used 3 cans of paint.

Tip 2: Don’t spray on windy days, I suspect I lost almost a whole can battling the wind in trying to get the bodywork painted. Don’t Rush, take your time.

Interior detail is amazing!

Now I mentioned research and planning earlier, and planning is an important part of this built. If you just put the kit together as stated and tried to paint it, you would be left in a nightmare of close together parts that should be different colours. Even step one can’t really be completed until later in the build as you need to paint the taillights in 2 different colours, and the body needs to be painted before you can attach them. So plan ahead, and work out what gets put together before and after painting and you will be far happier with the result.

One thing I loved about the instructions is that they presume you know what you are doing. Parts are rarely needed to be labelled by their numbers, and the screws are also labelled clearly as to size and number needed for any given step. Not only that but each screw is in it’s own labelled bag, often with a spare in each size which I did need.

Tip 3: The screws that hold in the tail lights need 2 different screwdrivers, get it right or you strip the small M1.6 philips head screws. Spares in the kit to the rescue!

So whilst a first glance at the kit may be panic inducing, the steps move through logically and smoothly. All parts were good fits, especially the metal parts. I had to remove some moulding flash from a few parts, but it probably doesn’t show up when you look at it on a larger scale. I probably spent more time worrying about what colours what part would be than any concerns with the build itself.

I loved that all the lights have provision for LED lights to be fitted, and I thought the magnet built into the bonnet and frame to keep the bonnet closed (and a similar arrangement with the passenger doors) were very clever additions to this detailed kit. Similarly the great looking, but actually made of rubber so they don’t break off so easily rear view mirrors were also a clever inclusion.

Painting the large body proved to be my biggest headache with a lot more real estate to cover with paint than I am used to. As a result of rushing (yes, again take your time!) and inexperience I can see a slight variation in the colouring on a couple of my panels. Whilst it isn’t particularly noticeable it has given me a few ideas to weather the model from an as new look, to a work and repaired look of a well used vehicle, but that will be a topic of a different article.

Tip 4: Paint all of your exterior panels at the same time, and shake the c^@& out of the cans before you start spraying.

Tip 5: Don’t skimp on masking tape, the Tamiya tape is worth it over normal blue masking tape, and take it off as soon as you can, even between coats.

Tip 6: if you need to remove masking tape residue without damaging the paint, I found WD40 does wonder after trying about 20 other products.

Bits I didn’t like about the kit, well they are few and far between. The back of the headrests and interior of the canopy on the tray could have had a little more detail, but considering the detail there is to be found on this kit, it really is nit picking.

The Final Result

Well I would be telling porky pies of I said I was 100% happy with the result, but that is entirely down to small mistakes made on my part. As far is the kit is concerned, it is magnificent. It more than justifies it’s asking price and is rich in detail and features. Be it for a hard working crawler or shelf queen, it has certainly entered the annuls of the Crawler Hall of Fame as an iconic vehicle recreated with perfect clarity.

I have learnt a lot from the build, and enjoyed it more than a little, in fact I found myself contemplating what I could or would do differently, or improve upon, next time. I wonder what else RC4WD have up their sleeve. In the meantime, Brady, didn’t you have a Gelande 2 that needed some repairs ……

Want to get your hands on this 80’s goodness, then hit up RC4WD at
https://store.rc4wd.com/RC4WD-1985-Toyota-4Runner-Hard-Body-Complete-Set_p_7220.html

New Rc4wd 1985 Toyota 4Runner Hard Body

We can finally release details of the new 4Runner body from RC4WD. It has been in our hot little hands for just over a week now and we couldn’t say a word! For those that don’t know the 4Runner, it was basically a Toyota Hilux with an extra row of seats, a roll bar and a removable fibreglass canopy over the tray, and now you can have an RC one .

Now rc4wd have a reputation for amazing scale products, but I could not believe my eyes at the evel of detail when I opened the box, it was more like a fine scale model than rc model body. Opening doors, bonnet, removable tailgate, even warning label stickers! Newbies beware, some serious model making skills will be needed to complete this body to its full potential.

Needless to say, I will be taking my time to do the model justice, but I am wondering what colour I should paint it, any suggestions? Of course we will be keeping you all in the loop as the build progresses so keep an eye out for updates.

Specifications:
Injection Molded ABS Plastic
Clear ABS Windows
Full Interior
Dashboard with Steering Wheel
Opening Hood and Doors
Magnets Keep Hood/Doors Closed
Opening Tailgate
Removable Top for Open Air Feel
LED Compatible
Wheelbase: 11.3in / 287.0mm
Length: 19.1in / 484.2mm
Width: 7.73in / 196.4mm
Height: 5.57in / 141.5mm
Weight: 35.2oz / 997.0g

Finally a massive shout out to RC4WD for sending us this exciting body to test, as well as a trailfinder 2 to test it on, so keep your eyes peeled for that review too.

Pre order this body at https://store.rc4wd.com/RC4WD-1985-Toyota-4Runner-Hard-Body-Complete-Set_p_7220.html

720 Spin exporting to the USA

It is always great to see Australian RC Manufacturers, and even better to see them succeed.  720 Spin have started exporting their products to the USA announcing today a deal with Rotor Ron to start stocking their products.

Rotor Ron is famous for his high quality of products and super fast motors and it is great to see them selling Aussie Made!

AARCMCC Rule Updates – Batteries & Mugen MTC-1

AARCMCC have released through their 1:10 On Road Facebook page  a rule clarification and an update to the battery list.

Lets start with the touring car, AARCMCC have clarified the legality of the Mugen MTC-1 and it’s front bumper  As you can read below the ruling is that the bumper and the car are legal for use.

We have had some questions raised about the legality of the recently released Mugen MTC-1 touring car. The item in particular is the advertised ‘Aerodynamic front bumper’, which may contravene regulation 9.5.1.6 “Under body/chassis aerodynamic aids of any nature are not allowed.”

Following discussion of the committee, we have concluded that whilst the car in question is advertised with bumper as an “aero-shaped” component, the primary function is as a bumper/foam bumper support, not an aerodynamic device.
The intent of the regulations is to avoid home made bolt-on skirts and diffusers, not to restrict mass produced cars from competition.

As such the MTC-1 is legal for use in all Sanctioned AARCMCC events.

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In the land of batteries, there has been an update to the battery list to include Team Zombie batteries on the approved batteries list.  Now most of these are High Voltage packs, which personally I think should not be allowed on the list.  It gives easy scope for people to cheat and use higher voltages, and more work for officials who have to test the battery voltages.  That said, it is just my opinion but as my club is looking at running a state title for the first time in 2018, all I see is more work….
For those interested here is the link to the information about which packs are now on the approved list from Team Zombie  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8ABYMx7IGiCSlJiSEVqR2dtWjA/view and below the statement that accompanied it.

Zombie Batteries – Local Approval

We have recently had some discussions about the use of Zombie Batteries at AARCMCC sanctioned events. Having been in contact with both racers and the distributor, it’s been drawn to light that battery approval lags well behind motors. For example, the BRCA only update their lists twice a year, and ROAR haven’t updated for a while.
Having discussed this among representatives from both Electric sections (On and Off-road), we have the solution to provide a local approval.
The stipulations were;
1) Batteries must have been submitted to ROAR and/or BRCA for approval on their lists (this has been provided, to both ROAR and BRCA)
2) The batteries are commercially available for sale (they are, and have been for some time)
3) Samples sent need to be sent to AARCMCC for measurement and reference (complied with)

With this, we are happy to announce that Zombie Batteries detailed in the attached pdf are as of now legal for use at AARCMCC sanctioned events.

We are always keen to work with local distributors to aid in making sure equipment is able to be used, and if any other supplier wishes to enquire as such, please get in contact with us.

Review: 720 Spin Setup Tools Part 1

What are they?

These setup tools allow you to quickly and easily adjust the toe and camber on a variety of 1:10 scale radio control vehicles. Also available is a set of camber gauges and a longer set of plates to suit Stadium Trucks and Short Course Trucks with their wider stance. Available in 3 fluorescent colours there is an option to please most people, but not get lost in your pit bag.  Those being Yellow, Pink and the Green set that is pictured in this review.

72ab39_orig

The Review

Continue reading Review: 720 Spin Setup Tools Part 1