Category Archives: Accessories

AARCMCC Rule Updates – Batteries & Mugen MTC-1

AARCMCC have released through their 1:10 On Road Facebook page  a rule clarification and an update to the battery list.

Lets start with the touring car, AARCMCC have clarified the legality of the Mugen MTC-1 and it’s front bumper  As you can read below the ruling is that the bumper and the car are legal for use.

We have had some questions raised about the legality of the recently released Mugen MTC-1 touring car. The item in particular is the advertised ‘Aerodynamic front bumper’, which may contravene regulation 9.5.1.6 “Under body/chassis aerodynamic aids of any nature are not allowed.”

Following discussion of the committee, we have concluded that whilst the car in question is advertised with bumper as an “aero-shaped” component, the primary function is as a bumper/foam bumper support, not an aerodynamic device.
The intent of the regulations is to avoid home made bolt-on skirts and diffusers, not to restrict mass produced cars from competition.

As such the MTC-1 is legal for use in all Sanctioned AARCMCC events.

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In the land of batteries, there has been an update to the battery list to include Team Zombie batteries on the approved batteries list.  Now most of these are High Voltage packs, which personally I think should not be allowed on the list.  It gives easy scope for people to cheat and use higher voltages, and more work for officials who have to test the battery voltages.  That said, it is just my opinion but as my club is looking at running a state title for the first time in 2018, all I see is more work….
For those interested here is the link to the information about which packs are now on the approved list from Team Zombie  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8ABYMx7IGiCSlJiSEVqR2dtWjA/view and below the statement that accompanied it.

Zombie Batteries – Local Approval

We have recently had some discussions about the use of Zombie Batteries at AARCMCC sanctioned events. Having been in contact with both racers and the distributor, it’s been drawn to light that battery approval lags well behind motors. For example, the BRCA only update their lists twice a year, and ROAR haven’t updated for a while.
Having discussed this among representatives from both Electric sections (On and Off-road), we have the solution to provide a local approval.
The stipulations were;
1) Batteries must have been submitted to ROAR and/or BRCA for approval on their lists (this has been provided, to both ROAR and BRCA)
2) The batteries are commercially available for sale (they are, and have been for some time)
3) Samples sent need to be sent to AARCMCC for measurement and reference (complied with)

With this, we are happy to announce that Zombie Batteries detailed in the attached pdf are as of now legal for use at AARCMCC sanctioned events.

We are always keen to work with local distributors to aid in making sure equipment is able to be used, and if any other supplier wishes to enquire as such, please get in contact with us.

Review: 720 Spin Setup Tools Part 1

What are they?

These setup tools allow you to quickly and easily adjust the toe and camber on a variety of 1:10 scale radio control vehicles. Also available is a set of camber gauges and a longer set of plates to suit Stadium Trucks and Short Course Trucks with their wider stance. Available in 3 fluorescent colours there is an option to please most people, but not get lost in your pit bag.  Those being Yellow, Pink and the Green set that is pictured in this review.

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The Review

Continue reading Review: 720 Spin Setup Tools Part 1

Crash tested: Highest DLP750 Servo

Welcome to the first edition of Crash Tested. The review column where I will take an RC product thats new (to me) and go do my usual thing to see how it performs. There may be crashing, they’re may be winning (sometimes) but at the end, I have a verdict.

On my test bench I have a brand new Highest RC DLP750 low profile servo, aimed at 1/10 on road and off road vehicles in Highest RC’s regular fashion of good looks and impressive specs.

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Mounted up and ready to go! Oh father please forgive the sins of my messy wiring! 

Build and specs

An aluminium top and middle case, with plastic bottom looks very nice in any car. That ‘full metal jacket’ look that everyone likes is mostly there on the DLP750, although slightly diminished due to the plastic bottom cover, but we can get over that once its installed in the car!

A Coreless motor and full metal internal gears puts it on the same level as its main competitors in the Futaba BLS571SV and Savox 1251mg, however its 51.6g weight makes it 10g heaver than the futaba and 7g heavier than the Savox, if you’re a stock racer who’s watching the scales closely, this may be a deal breaker for you.

What the DLP750 loses in weight, it makes up for in its torque and speed numbers, boasting 0.1s / 11.8kg-cm on 6.0V, and 0.08s / 14.3kg-cm on 7.4V, its a full head and shoulders above the Futaba at 0.08 / 11/0kg-cm on 7.4V, meanwhile the Savox only hits 0.09s / 9kg-cm at 6V (no specs given for 7.4V)

With a 25t spline to match up with Futaba and Savox users, plus plenty of extra torque and a flashy ‘Full Metal Jacket’ look, at the cost of 7-10g of weight? This servo looks to be a winner for most.

Track Test

The testing comes at a perfect time, after last week I managed to knock a few teeth off the internal gears in my Savox 1251mg ‘Black Edition’, while I drove my Team Associated B6 around the indoor carpet track at Perth Radio Electric Car Club (PRECC). So it was time for a new servo to continue racing.

On Saturday I bolted the DLP750 into my B6, set the centre & endpoints, and threw the car down at PRECC. Right away the steering felt strong and more sensitive, even on 6.0V BEC .after turning a few laps I was feeling comfortable with the handling and pulled the car in to tinker with the BEC and try again.

After turning the BEC voltage up to 7.2 on my ORCA R32 ESC, i headed back out on track to see if I could truly tell the difference between alleged 11.8kg-cm and 14.3kg-cm of torque. Im happy to say that I have always struggled for steering on the tight carpet track at PRECC, however the increased torque made all the steering inputs happen in a flash, so much so I continued to crash into the apex pipes for the next 3 minutes while I tried to figure out the inputs I needed.

I settled down and added -5% expo into the steering before trying to set some fast laps, managing to steer harder meant I could cut tighter lines and change directions faster in the chicanes, a welcome addition to the small 13s layout! I bested my old hot lap from 13.63s to 13.28 s before the run finished. Enough proof to convince me this servo is up to the task!

To further cement my liking for the servo, during my final practice session I had a huge crash and tumble, which actually broke my modified (HB parts) steering linkage on the B6, but did not harm the servo at all.

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The Highest DLP750 looks great! (nicely broken improvised steering linkage)

Conclusion

If you want a servo with good looks, good specs and solid quality, at a decent price…then you should look no further than the Highest DLP-750 Low profile servo. At an advertised retail of $169.95 its not the cheapest servo on the market, but its still cheaper and looks nicer than its main competitor, the Futaba BLS571SV which would set you back $180+ at most Hobby Shops in Australia. Im very happy with the DLP750 in my B6, and I am definitely going to be putting one in my B64 4WD ahead of the upcoming IFMAR world championships in China!

The Highest RC range is now available at Hearns Hobbies in Melbourne, and Ryper Hobbies in Perth, thanks to the guys at Ryper for putting this one aside for me to purchase and test!

720 Spin – New Setup Products

I love being able to promote new Australian RC companies, so it is always an exciting day when I find out about a new one.  720 Spin is a very new company selling performance RC Products from their base in Victoria.

72ab39_origThese products take the form of toe and camber wheels, camber gauges and more.  Make sure you find them over on Facebook and give them a like as well as check out what products they have available on their website at http://www.720spin.com.au. You will also find their products at Traction RCDetect a Den Hobbies & Prospecting as well as I am sure other stores in the near future.

In other excited news, I have a set of these arriving for testing soon and I will be able to give them a good test run at the largest event of the year at my local club, the 2017 Launceston R/C Cup.  So keep your eyes peeled for some first hand reports of what these are like.

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Review – Boom Racing 007-BRV2 High Stability Aluminium Gyro

Hello again from the Perth RC drift scene, today I’m bringing you a review of the Boom Racing 007-BRV2 High Stability Aluminium Gyro.

Boom Racing is a brand that few of you may have heard of before. It’s the in-house brand of Ausdrift sponsor AsiaTees Hobbies and includes over 2700 lines over a very wide selection of chassis including; crawlers, buggies, touring car and drift cars. For this review AsiaTees kindly provided one of their very nice 007-BRV2 high stability aluminium gyros for testing. At the time of writing the 007-BRV2 was available from AsiaTees for $45.08 AUD with free postage from Hong Kong (On orders over $100 AUD).

BR High Stability Alloy Gyro
Boom Racing High Stability Aluminium Gyroscope #007-BR, Photo: AsiaTees

While some regard fitting a gyro to any kind of RC car as cheating, in the case of RWD drift it’s essential to overcoming the difficulties that working at small scale present. In a full size drift car the rotational inertia of the front wheels and tyres creates a natural gyroscopic effect (remember those high school science lessons) allowing the driver to release the steering wheel and let the tyres steer themselves. Due to the relatively low mass of RC drift wheels and tyres and relatively high holding torque of the steering servos used, this simply does not happen at a 1:10 scale. A gyro when correctly set adds a simulated effect of exactly what happens on a 1:1 car.

The Boom Racing 007-BRV2 gyro is available in 6 colours; black, blue, red, pink, green and gold. For this review AsiaTees supplied the gold version as shown above. The attractive aluminium cased gyro is supplied with a very nice mounting tray and all required fasteners. Spare mounting trays can be purchased separately to allow the gyro to be easily moved between models. Gyro gain can be adjusted either digitally with CH3 or manually by turning the gain pot. For manual mode a handy gain adjustment driver is also supplied which saves hunting around in your toolbox for a suitable driver. There are 2 dip switches on the gyro for setting digital or analogue mode and for gyro direction.

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Boom Racing 007-BRV2GD, Photo: AsiaTees

The Boom Racing 007-BRV2 gyro was fitted to 2 different cars for this review, to Jayden Goncalves’ brand new RWD dedicated Yokomo YD-2 Plus and to my RWD converted Alex Racing Design CER-D08 premium. Fitting and connecting the gyro is very easy with 3 short leads for connecting the gyro to your steering servo and receiver CH1 & CH3. The supplied instructions are light on for detail but very easy to follow. For testing purposes I simply mounted the gyro to my chassis with double sided tape rather than using the aluminium mounting tray, Jayden did much the same on his YD-2 Plus.

For me, the overall driving impression with the Boom Racing 007-BRV2 was a big improvement over the MST LSD 2.0 RS gyro it replaced. The MST gyro retails for between $80-90 AUD whereas the 007-BRV2 has much the same functionality at roughly half the price. I noticed on startup that the 007-BRV2 has a different centre frequency to the MST gyro, but once trimmed it maintained that centre setting perfectly throughout the run and on subsequent starts. When digitally set with CH3 of my Futaba 3PM radio to 50% gain, I felt that the 007-BRV2 displayed much smoother action and reduced twitchiness from my OMG D2-LP-CF07s servo compared to the previous MST unit at the same gain setting. For me this resulted in a much more “connected” feel to the steering and far greater predictability and confidence, both of which allowed me to drive a much smoother line with great control while still getting heaps of angle and countersteer.

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Boom Racing: 007-BRV2 gyro, Chassis: CER-D08 Premium, Owner & Photo: Noel Gettingby

Jayden’s impression of the Boom Racing 007-BRV2 was somewhat less positive than mine. Jayden fitted it to his brand new Yokomo YD-2 Plus for it’s maiden runs. He also commented that the 007-BR centred perfectly once trimmed but that on his car it suffered from gyro wobble (caused when the gyro over-corrects at low steering angles and the front wheels wobble). He also found it difficult to find the sweet spot for the gain, he ended up settling on ~40% in order to minimise the wobble from his Futaba S9570SV servo. After his review Jayden fitted a Futaba GY430 gyro, which he found to be smoother for his combination after some tuning. The Futaba gyro retails for $80-90 and also has similar functionality to the 007-BRV2.

In all, the Boom Racing 007-BRV2 high stability aluminium gyro is a very capable gyro, well suited to RWD drift at half the price of the better known brands. In addition the very easy mounting, beautiful appearance and wide colour choice will suit just about any chassis scheme. Give Boom Racing by AsiaTees a try when next looking for great value, high quality hop-ups for your RC chassis.

https://www.facebook.com/ausdrift/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ausdrift/

http://www.asiatees.com/

http://www.boomracingrc.com/

Boom Racing release 3 new Rigs

Yup, not one but three new rigs from Boom racing, and two of them are 6×6’s!  They are a Land Rover D90, the G63 6×6 truck, and the 7GI Mil 6×6 military truck.

1/10 6×6 Off-Road Military Truck, the 7GI Mil

Features:
-Pre-painted 7GI Mil 6×6 Truck Body
-All-Wheel Drive
-Military Look, 1.9″ Tires On White 5 Lug Stamped Wheels
-Pre-Assembled Chassis
-Boom Racing Spare Tire Case
-Full Bearing Set
-Realistic Transfer Case
-Assembled Damper Units
-NATO green color
-CNC Machined & Assembled Aluminum Axles Front And Rear
-Assembled Gearbox With Installed Motor
-Motor, Servo And ESC

Specs:
-Length: 74cm
-Width: 20cm
-Height: 27cm
-Wheelbase: 44cm
-Weight: (box included) 10.4kg
Land Rover D90
The D90 is a ridiculously popular car, and we know that people are going to LOVE what Boom Racing has in store for them.

Features:
-Scale 1:10
-Overall length (bumper to bumper):422mm
-Frame width :85mm
-Overall width:210mm
-Wheelbase: variable 260-295mm
-Mainly all parts in 6061 alloy Assembled
-Full metal internal gears in axles
-Full metal internal gears in transmission
-Full metal internal gears in transfer case
-HD universal drive axles
-All metal steering rods
-Steel shackle mounts

To complete this chassis you will need:
-2-channel radio system
-Steering servo
-Electronic Speed Controller
-Motor
-Battery
-Body

1/10 G63 6×6 truck
This G63 6×6 truck has everything you need to get started with a 6×6 vehicle!

Features:
-Pre-painted 6×6 Truck Body
-All-Wheel Drive
-Scale Look, 1.9″ Tires On White 5 Lug Stamped Wheels
-Pre-Assembled Chassis
-Realistic Transfer Case
-Assembled Damper Units
-CNC Machined & Assembled Aluminum Axles Front And Rear
-Assembled Gearbox With Installed Motor
-Motor, Servo And ESC
-Motor-power distributing system is loaded horizontally in the center
-Variable 3 gears for the shaft distance: 280mm/290mm/300mm
-3 kinds of adjustable poses for the shock absorber

Measurement for the car:
-Wheel base: 150 mm to 440 mm
-Width: 220 mm
-Height: 230 mm
-Diameter wheel: 112mm

Specs:
-Length: 64cm
-Width: 28.5cm
-Height: 23cm
-Weight: (box included) 7.8 kg

Source: http://www.boomracingrc.com/asiatees-exclusive-boom-racings-3-new-models-1527

Are you getting the battery that you paid for?

It has been interesting seeing the capacity and C rating of Lipo batteries rise and rise of late, and I have always wondered how long that increase was sustainable on the currently available technology.  Now it looks like SMC may have answered that for me!

Superior Matching Concepts, or SMC, is a brand of battery that I was shown by then fellow racer Scott Guyatt as a good bang for your buck battery much akin to the Intellect batteries I am/was running at the time.  I am afraid I am yet to buy any, but I am in need of some younger batteries so whey are moving up the list in priority and these are at the top of the list.

However a post on their facebook page today caught my attention so I thought I would re-post it for our readers to see. The complete statement is included below.


I’m making this post to try and help educate everyone about how crazy the Lipo ratings have become and are pretty much useless. I know most of you will appreciate this post and some will think I’m just using this to promote SMC but this is really to open some eyes.

First let me explain the fact that their is no true C rate testing standards. Some factories use mAh retention and others use heat and voltage curve to determine the C rate. Every factory knows the C rate of their cells based on one of these 2 methods of C rate testing.

When I started testing and buying Lipos 8 years ago the C rates were 10 to 20C for car packs. At that time the factories were giving true C rates based on their testing method for C rate. Within a few years C rates doubled but this was just marketing to try and sell more packs and make more money. Now 8 years later it’s even crazier with some outrageous C rate claims and mAh has also started to increase on the labels but not on the cells. In my opinion 80% or more of the packs being sold in car market today have a true C rate of 15 to 25C using the heat and voltage curve method for C rate testing. Using the mAh retention you can add 5C. There are some 30C and 35C packs available but these are very rare and cost more to make.

C rate is the amp rate at which the cell/pack can be discharged at. So a 5000-20C can do 100amps. A 7200-20C can do 144 amps and so on. IR(Internal Resistance) is directly related to a cells ability to handle amp loads. So it’s not possible for a pack to have higher C rate and higher IR. This means a 7200-20C has to be lower in IR than a 5000-20C. The size of the cell also limits it’s mAh or C rate/IR. In car packs with hard cases we’re limited by the size of the case. This means if you want to increase mAh you must increase IR or vice versa. A 7200-25C will have higher IR than a 6000-35C. The 7200 will be able to do 180 amps and the 6000 will be able to do 210 amps. Only way the 6000 can provide more amps is to have lower IR.

Now that we know this if true C ratings would exist the consumer/racer would be able to know what pack better suits his needs. Unfortunately this isn’t the case so there really is no way for the customer/racer to know. SMC is no different than others as we also use inflated C rates as we have no choice. If we would use true C rates we would be out of business. What we do try and do that is different is make sure that our ratings mean something. For example our 5000-40C will have higher IR than our 5000-50C and so on.

Here is something that I find interesting and frustrating at the same time. Some of our competitors buying the same packs we do offer them with higher ratings. This leads to some customers buying these higher priced packs instead of ours. Here are 2 examples. The 4400-60C shorty which we sell for 29.95 is being offered as a 4600-90C at 44.95 and it’s the exact same pack that we offer. The 7200-60C-2S pack we offer for 39.95 is being offered as a 7600-75C for 64.95.

Something else interesting is that a customer who bought one of our 5000-40C-2S packs at 24.95 compared it to a 5450-120C-2S pack at 129.99 and told me that our 40C pack ran longer and faster in the same vehicle and the 120C pack was new to make a fair comparison.

Now that we know C rates are all made up and it’s actually getting a bit ridiculous to claim even higher C rates it seems like in the past few years mAh is now what is being inflated. Recently I tested a 7000-1S pack that only put out 6222mAh. I will admit some of our packs also have a bit lower mAh than claimed but this is due to the model being improved to provide lower IR. If you drop the IR the mAh drops.

I hope this post can help some of you not fall for all the BS and hype and don’t be surprised if SMC starts releasing higher rated packs to try and keep up as it’s very frustrating to under rate our packs and lose sales.


Source: https://www.facebook.com/smcracing?fref=nf
Website: http://www.smc-racing.net/
Australian Stockist: http://www.coast2coastrc.com.au/

7T-GL High Mobility 6X6 Truck from Integy

I can stand (well sit) here hand on heart and say, I didn’t realise that Integy actually made whole vehicles, not just parts and tools.  I know, I must have been living under a rock somewhere, but it was the release of a 6×6 truck this morning that caught my eye, and I was impressed.  Yes, it costs about $1,200 US, but it is an incredible piece of machinery!  Let’s start with the blurb form Integy:

Here it is: our new 1/10 7T-GL High Mobility 6X6 Truck! Realistically modelled after the historical MAN Kat1 series of 7-ton military-spec all-terrain trucks developed for the German Army, our 7T-GL High Mobility 6X6 Truck is a 1/10-scale machine like nothing we’ve ever released before! With the full alloy body, chassis, suspension and drivetrain, this beast tips the scales at over 11 pounds! We have a limited number of these ARTR machines, go here for the full spec:http://www.integy.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=20876&p_catid=389

There are very few vehicles like this available on the market, and most multi axle vehicles like this are custom builds, something I don’t think I am capable of personally.  So i’d get something like this if I was given the chance!

Billet Machined 6X6 7T GL High-Mobility Off-Road Truck 1/10 Size ARTR