Category Archives: New Products

Contra Industries – Custom Decals


Have you seen those cool sticker wraps on chargers and radio’s, or ever wondered where to get your own custom decals and graphics? Well we spoke to Adelaide based, Contra Industries to see how they make it happen.

It all starts with you finding a design or logo which can be sent electronically, the higher the resolution the better the results will be. If you don’t have something in mind then Reece from Contra Industries can steer you in the right direction.

Once a design has been chosen it will be scaled and an electronic draft will be created. Cut lines will be added to the image for easy peeling from the backing sheet. The image is printed by a commercial vinyl printer onto a quality piece of adhesive sticker vinyl. If required a varnish can also be added to preserve the decal from containments like nitro fuel.

The decal is then complete and ready for application, Contra Industries can post your new decals to you around Australia.

If your looking for some quality custom decals to add the finishing touches to your model, rc race car or other rc related equipment then Contra Industries is contactable via Facebook. They also have a lot of their past work on display for inspiration.


Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 Lite build review

Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 Lite build review

There is no doubt that the ER-12M 2.0 lightweight is a good looking 2wd buggy with its milled alloy chassis, carbon towers and beautifully presented shocks. I have also found that it is very similar to the Team Durango DEX210, which is probably a good thing considering these are a popular and well regarded buggy. Over a week I set out to build the ER-12 and review it as I went about building it.

Chassis and Towers

The chassis of this car is possibly the most striking I have ever seen and it went together very well, there were no issues at all and the car feels rock solid. The chassis has braces running the full length to add strength and the shock towers are made of 5mm thick carbon fibre. The chassis and towers are for me the most impressive part of the car and if you’re seeking a solid and tough platform that can handle the big impacts then this car is most definitely for you.

The arms on this car are made of a nice strong plastic and they have very little free play. Arms feature a grub screw so that you can adjust suspension droop in the same manner you would on an on-road car. Both front and rear arms are gullwing style, however there is currently no straight arm option available for the front of these cars, which would be more suited to Australian track conditions.

The space for the electronics can be tight, depending on what electronics you are fitting into your vehicle. I found that you must use a low profile servo with this vehicle or you will really struggle to fit anything in the front other than the smallest of electronics. I have used the electronics from my stadium truck in the test vehicle and I had to lightly grind a small section of the chassis brace in order to neatly fit it all in.

Another great feature of the chassis are the Intech monogrammed brass weights which can be placed in the front to improve weight distribution. I also liked the swing away carbon fibre battery straps and alloy thumb screws which not only look great but will make battery changes quick and easy.

Steering and Suspension

Steering on the ER-12 is an all alloy and carbon fibre affair with the drag link being carbon fibre and all other components being alloy. The steering is super smooth with the servo sitting inside a frame rather than on individual mounts.

Suspension is also impressive with an all alloy body, alloy cap and red anodised collar. Shocks went together pretty much the same as any other shocker I’ve built, are smooth and do not leak a drop. The pistons are slightly oversize at 12.4mm which means that you won’t be using your big bore TLR or AE pistons in this car. I found this a little frustrating as I have a plethora of 12mm pistons which would not fit the ER-12. The stock pistons are all 6 hole of varying sizes, I have chosen to use the 1.2mm up front with 30wt oil and the 1.3mm in the back with 25wt oil.


The ER-12 comes standard with a traditional style 4 gear transmission, however a 3 gear is also available. You also have a choice of ball or gear differential and I have chosen to build our ER-12 with the 4 gear transmission and with the ball differential. The ball differential went together easily and is very smooth, but make sure you fully compress the spring before assembly. I especially liked the caged thrust bearing which is carried on the inside of the outdrives, rather than outside, where they would be more susceptible to dirt ingression. The differential rings are also keyed and sit securely on the inside of the outdrives. The differential also has an all alloy T-nut which retains the main spring on the differential, rather than a plastic one. The top shaft of the transmission on the ER-12 is an interesting setup, as it is reversed with the slipper being adjusted from the rear. Overall the driveline has no slop, moves freely and is precise.

Body and wing

The body and wing is made of a quite thick and strong polycarbonate plastic, however the cut lines were not clear around the transmission and you will need to mark your own lines. This is necessary to get the body to fit around the transmission. Once you have cut a hole for the transmission the body fits well and comes with Velcro to secure it as well as a pin arrangement. I removed the pin arrangement and will just use the Velcro around the edges of the chassis to secure it.


The kit as a whole is very good but if I was to make any changes I would like to see the instructions printed a little bigger to make them clearer and also the screws placed in bags with labels telling you their size. This would speed up the build particularly if it was your first time building an Intech vehicle. I would also like Intech to provide in their instructions the spring rate of the kit springs, the number of teeth on the kit spur and the final drive ratio to make setting the car up easier.


The whole kit went together very well and has taken about 10 hours to build. Tolerances throughout the car are precise and overall the car has little to no slop in key areas such as the arms, steering and shock mounts. Components on this car are all top notch and you certainly get a lot of standard parts that others would call hop-ups and charge you extra for.

I originally intended to build and race this car in the stock buggy class but as I built it I have come to the conclusion that it would be better suited to the modified class. The solid build and lack of smaller spur options has meant that getting the ER-12 setup for modified will be far easier than stock.

In the new year I’ll be bringing you a full race and track review of the ER-12, so bring on the 2018 season! are currently offering 15% off the entire Intech Racing range and throwing in free Australian postage!

If you’d like check out the full range of Intech Racing cars and products check out or to get your hands on any of the cars in the Intech Racing range, contact the Australian distributor, Duncan at or (TEL) 0408 906 326. We also need to give a huge Thankyou to the team at Intech Racing and

Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 buggy Lite- Unboxing Review

Intech Racing, I had never heard of them either until recently, but they are a Taiwanese manufacturer making a fresh push into the Australian market with some unique and innovative ideas. Intech Racing is a relative newcomer to Australia but they have been building cars for over ten years with a focus on continuous improvement. Intech Racing manufactures a range of off-road buggies and trucks in both 10th and 8th scale, with either electric or nitro power trains.

Intech Racing has kindly provided Aussie RC News with an ER-12M 2.0 Lite 2wd buggy to build and review. Prior to sending a test vehicle, Intech Racing contacted me to discuss which vehicle we would like to test first. After looking at their range of smart looking vehicles the ER-12M 2.0 Lite 2wd buggy stood out to me as a vehicle which would be well suited to racing and being 2wd we could put it to the test in the 2wd stock class, racing against the established brands.

The ER-12 2.0M is a rear wheel drive buggy, with a mid-mounted motor design and a narrow aluminium chassis. This type of design is now the most common in Australia, with rear mounted motor platforms now a rarity. Continue reading Intech Racing ER-12M 2.0 buggy Lite- Unboxing Review

Intech in Australia

Taiwanese company Intech has been pushing into Australia recently with RC Store now carrying a range of their vehicles as well as providing spares, manuals, race setups and more. So lets have a look at the vehicles that Intech are selling.  

in 1:10 there are four vehicles in the line;

  • ERCS-10 a 4wd short course truck Kit
  • ER-14M 4wd buggy Kit
  • ER-12M 2.0 Lite 2wd buggy Kit
  • ER-12M 2.0 2wd buggy Kit.

In the 1:8 line you have the choice of;

  • BR-6E Sport  Electric buggy Kit
  • BR-6 E Electric buggy Kit
  • BR-6 2.0 Sport Nitro buggy Kit
  • BR-6 2.0 Nitro buggy Kit
  • BR-5 Nitro Buggy Ready To Run

So Intech have most genres and vehicles covered in their range at an excellent price point.  So check them out on their own website at or at RS Store


Losi Tenacity Monster Truck

Somewhere along the way I must have been missing the news as the Losi Tenacity line of vehicles somehow slipped under my radar!

A 4wd Monster Truck based on the Losi TEN platform, how can you go wrong!  RTR, Brushless, Spektrum Radio, AVC and a great looking Monster Truck it certainly seems like a winner to me. Heck, it even includes a FPV camera mount, how much fun would that be!


Crash tested: Highest DLP750 Servo

Welcome to the first edition of Crash Tested. The review column where I will take an RC product thats new (to me) and go do my usual thing to see how it performs. There may be crashing, they’re may be winning (sometimes) but at the end, I have a verdict.

On my test bench I have a brand new Highest RC DLP750 low profile servo, aimed at 1/10 on road and off road vehicles in Highest RC’s regular fashion of good looks and impressive specs.

Mounted up and ready to go! Oh father please forgive the sins of my messy wiring! 

Build and specs

An aluminium top and middle case, with plastic bottom looks very nice in any car. That ‘full metal jacket’ look that everyone likes is mostly there on the DLP750, although slightly diminished due to the plastic bottom cover, but we can get over that once its installed in the car!

A Coreless motor and full metal internal gears puts it on the same level as its main competitors in the Futaba BLS571SV and Savox 1251mg, however its 51.6g weight makes it 10g heaver than the futaba and 7g heavier than the Savox, if you’re a stock racer who’s watching the scales closely, this may be a deal breaker for you.

What the DLP750 loses in weight, it makes up for in its torque and speed numbers, boasting 0.1s / 11.8kg-cm on 6.0V, and 0.08s / 14.3kg-cm on 7.4V, its a full head and shoulders above the Futaba at 0.08 / 11/0kg-cm on 7.4V, meanwhile the Savox only hits 0.09s / 9kg-cm at 6V (no specs given for 7.4V)

With a 25t spline to match up with Futaba and Savox users, plus plenty of extra torque and a flashy ‘Full Metal Jacket’ look, at the cost of 7-10g of weight? This servo looks to be a winner for most.

Track Test

The testing comes at a perfect time, after last week I managed to knock a few teeth off the internal gears in my Savox 1251mg ‘Black Edition’, while I drove my Team Associated B6 around the indoor carpet track at Perth Radio Electric Car Club (PRECC). So it was time for a new servo to continue racing.

On Saturday I bolted the DLP750 into my B6, set the centre & endpoints, and threw the car down at PRECC. Right away the steering felt strong and more sensitive, even on 6.0V BEC .after turning a few laps I was feeling comfortable with the handling and pulled the car in to tinker with the BEC and try again.

After turning the BEC voltage up to 7.2 on my ORCA R32 ESC, i headed back out on track to see if I could truly tell the difference between alleged 11.8kg-cm and 14.3kg-cm of torque. Im happy to say that I have always struggled for steering on the tight carpet track at PRECC, however the increased torque made all the steering inputs happen in a flash, so much so I continued to crash into the apex pipes for the next 3 minutes while I tried to figure out the inputs I needed.

I settled down and added -5% expo into the steering before trying to set some fast laps, managing to steer harder meant I could cut tighter lines and change directions faster in the chicanes, a welcome addition to the small 13s layout! I bested my old hot lap from 13.63s to 13.28 s before the run finished. Enough proof to convince me this servo is up to the task!

To further cement my liking for the servo, during my final practice session I had a huge crash and tumble, which actually broke my modified (HB parts) steering linkage on the B6, but did not harm the servo at all.

The Highest DLP750 looks great! (nicely broken improvised steering linkage)


If you want a servo with good looks, good specs and solid quality, at a decent price…then you should look no further than the Highest DLP-750 Low profile servo. At an advertised retail of $169.95 its not the cheapest servo on the market, but its still cheaper and looks nicer than its main competitor, the Futaba BLS571SV which would set you back $180+ at most Hobby Shops in Australia. Im very happy with the DLP750 in my B6, and I am definitely going to be putting one in my B64 4WD ahead of the upcoming IFMAR world championships in China!

The Highest RC range is now available at Hearns Hobbies in Melbourne, and Ryper Hobbies in Perth, thanks to the guys at Ryper for putting this one aside for me to purchase and test!

Vault RC Crawling Accessories & Trailers

When you think of scale accessories for RC crawlers you tend to think of companies in Asia or the United States as that is where the majority are based.  But that isn’t the whole picture as there are some amazing Australian companies doing some great work, and one of these is Vault RC..


Trailers for crawlers are one of the coolest accessories out there, but also one of the rarest because, well they are hard to find, and difficult to build in a fashion that looks realistic. Often you will see people ask, “How did you build that trailer?” rather than “Where did you buy it from?” Sadly for most people they lack the skills to fabricate a trailer using welders, grinders and other sharp items.  Add to that it can be very difficult and dangerous to make scale accessories and highly likely resulting in a trip to the hospital. This is only compounded by the fact that most people don’t own any of the specific tools and equipment needed to make them.

Enter Vault RC! Vault RC has designed a range of scale accessories for people to build, paint and add their finishing touches so people can say “I built that” safely. The Vault RC scale kits are designed and manufactured in Brisbane, Australia. Made from real high quality metal these kits will last years. The Vault RC kits come in a simple well made flat-pack form and can be made using simple tools like a screwdriver. There is no cutting, welding or grinding needed. When you buy with Vault RC you know you are buying a high quality and safe product designed specificity to help you say “I built that”.

As to product lineup, well it’s pretty diverse! You have three different trailers and a tow hitch for them available including a plain trailer, trailer with tradie racks and a camper trailer.  Accessories the choice is even wider Saw horses, step ladders, cargo trolleys,  tool boxes, ladders, even a camping chair and BBQ!!!

Where do I find Vault RC, on Facebook ( or their website at


Go big or go home, have a look at this buggy from TLR in 5th scale.  HPI eat your heart out, looks like this baby eats tracks for breakfast and for a big car seems to handle well.  Based not on the existing Losi 5th scale platform, but developed from the 8IGHT platform it looks designed (and ready) to RACE!

What we have seen about it so far;

* Cab forward race body
* 5mm thick, hard anodized 6061-T6 aluminum chassis
* Heavy duty brakes
* Racing style wing
* Dual steering servos
* Receiver battery steel heat shield
* 24mm, hard anodized aluminum shocks w/ bleeder caps
* Aluminum clutch carrier and center-diff case
* Engine mounted spark plug protector
* Adjustable toe & anti-squat plates
* Lightweight one piece wheels
* Ball-bearing ackerman plate w/ nutted screws
* Axle boots
* Lightweight dog bones
* Special race style air filter
* Hard-anodized aluminum shock towers

TLR05001 is the part number and an August release stateside, so I guess we will wait to see when O’Riely Model Products gets them into Australia!

PS, Bigsquid have some great photos of the car as well, check them out over at

Team Associated unleash the B6 and B6D


Firstly I thought it was an interesting side note to this release that the alternate version is the D (Dirt) rather than the namesake, the reverse of the B5 series where the B5 was a dirt car, and the B5M the mid mounted alternate if you like.

That said, the car certainly looks like a big step forward from the B5 which seemed more of an evolution of the B5 design. Either way, it’s always exciting to see new designs hitting the market, and it will be interesting to see them hit the tracks soon.

To see all the information and the new cars in action, check out the video from AE below